Former NRC Chairman Jaczko travels to Japan and urges transparency of nuclear regulators

Author: 4 Comments Share:

Former United States Nuclear Regulatory Commission Chairman Gregory Jaczko traveled to Japan this week, meeting Fukushima residents and stressing the importance of open dialogue and full information disclosure from the new nuclear safety agency which will be established in Japan after the March 11th nuclear disaster.

While speaking to Fukushima residents, Jaczko  stated that nuclear power plants should not be operated if the safety laws cannot guarantee that a major accident requiring large-scale evacuations will not occur. Jaczko was also understanding of the recent protests after the restart of the Ohi nuclear reactors, adding that he feels that dialogue is important between the conflicting sides.

During he tenure as the NRC Chairman, Jaczko often pointed out that only through openness could the regulating agency best protect the environment and public safety.

On February 9, 2012 Jaczko cast the lone dissenting vote on plans to build the first new nuclear power plant in more than 30 years when the NRC voted 4-1 to allow Atlanta-based Southern Co to build and operate two new nuclear power reactors at its existing Vogtle nuclear power plant in Georgia. He cited safety concerns stemming from Japan’s 2011 Fukushima nuclear disaster, saying “I cannot support issuing this license as if Fukushima never happened”.

Source: NHK

 

Previous Article

In-Focus Japan: Japan to study genetic effects of radiation – Hokkaido working on hydrogen explosion prevention

Next Article

San Onofre Reactor 2 to be subject of cost-benefit analysis

4 Comments

  1. Thought he was too broke to pay for his own lawyers. Gotta wonder why Harry Reid is footing the bill for this one, he already owns the NRC. . .

  2. BTW, the “dissenting” vote was about implementing the recommendations (essentially agreed to by all the other commissioners) without following established NRC regulations that mandate analysis for backfit. So, he was dissenting with following the established procedures that would encourage review, input, analysis and circumspect decision-making. The injudicious rush to fulfill an agenda and rescue his tarnished reputation, that, my friend, is the genuine NO-NO when it comes to nuclear health and safety.

Leave a Reply